Words of Art
From March 14 to June 16, 2013

 ImageFrom March 14 to June 16, 2013
 EDS GALERIA is pleased to present the group show: “Words of Art”, referring to the expression of “Works of Art”. The show is about the relationship between art and language: a branch of conceptualism that is still releveant in post-conceptual sulbatern contemporary art.
In 2009, the gallery organized a show entitled “Text-Works” | Con-Texto”, an exhibition with works that used text in their form and narrative. The title in Spanish (con-texto) means both with texts and also context, emphasizing the relationship between spectator and the context of the work.
WORDS OF ART draws on the importance of language in contemporary art. It points to the relationship between matter, text and México: all of the artists in the show, both Mexican and foreigners, live in this country. This show questions the way that cultures appropiate and cannibalize each other’s Art & Language. WORDS OF ART is linked with the implied relationship between a culture, its language and the language of the other (in this case, English).
The show welcomes the spectator with ten pieces from the project “Versos en papel picado” (Verses on paper cuts) by Maximo Gonzalez (Paraná, AR 1971-). “Maximo invited different poets to write verses in order to be integrated into a great street poem, using the Mexican traditional technique of paper cut, each verse is made by hits of hammers and chisel over the sheet of colored paper. Paper cut is commonly used to decorate streets, parks and façades during traditional and religious festivities in México”. This project was shown on a larger scale during the group show “Volver: Mexican Folk Art into Play”, San Francisco, CA, EUA 2010, as well as in “Invasión Ocupación Extensión” curated by Ander Azpiri, Centro Cultural de España en México, México DF, 2004.
TUYO and ME WE by Sandra Valenzuela (México, DF, 1981-) addresses the idea of territory and belonging, pointing towards the relationship between the work and the spectator as well as the thin line between acquisition and ownership within the art market.  What is Tuyo is Tu + Yo (the word “yours” in Spanish is the result of you + me) so it relates to the idea of the expanded self through relationships, as well as the blurred boundaries between identity, collectivity and ownership. One pice is in English and the one in Spanish, highlighting variations in the process of translation, which result from the unique relationship between each culture and its language. The version in Spanish is made in mirrored acrylic, two letters silver and two letters black. The piece ME WE is made in traslucent acrylic, which in its reflection, as seen by the subject, generates the duality of the relationship between the one and the other, as well as the sense of belonging implied in the we.
“Oil is not finished yet” by Máximo Gonzalez, “a sentence carved in a tire inner tube, which has been cut out to draw a threshold towards an era that still does not glimmer, but might be soon to come, and that is detached from the wheel, one of the most basic human inventions in the evolution of man.” The product, in this case the pneumatic inner tube, makes a statement of it’s subject matter: as a not-yet exhausted source, the tension relies in the “yet”. Through humor, it signifies the relationship between matter and power, especially important in Mexico, where oil represents 40% of the Natural Income. It also makes an ironic comment, like that of a decreasing arc, recalling a dysfunctional structure that despite its problems, still subsists. The piece was recently featured in his solo show Playful, curated by Alma Ruiz at CAFAM, LA, USA, 2012.
Adrián Guerrero (Guadalajara, MX 1975-) presents SOCIEDAD/SUCIEDAD, (society/filth) and IMPERCEPTIBLE. Both pieces relate to attitudes of the individual in his or her relationship with collectivity: either as an imperceptible subject or through rejection and humor. Sociedad/Suciedad (society-filth) functions by a change in meaning just by removing one part of a letter. It is made in bronze, the material of public momuments, which serve the function of commemorating a hero or event in the collective national narrative. It also point towards the quantity of waste produced by the constant consumerism of our global society. The piece IMPERCEPTIBLE functions in both English and Spanish. It makes reference to itself while also negatiing its motto: once you notice it, it no longer becomes imperceptible.
Rubén Gutierrez (Monterrey, MX 1972-) presents four rugs from the series “Philosophical Rugs” made in raw wool woven with a telar (rustic waving machine) from Oaxaca. The project intertwines the artisanal, traditional, hand made processes of Mexican Culture into the discourse of Contemporary Art. The rugs are woven with texts that make reference to the art world: the context becomes local (like the local technique employed to make the rugs), but the self-referencial nature of the object comments on its own context comes from a universal discourse of conceptual art. These are pieces to be seen, read, interpreted and stepped on.
Michele Chiossi (Lucca IT 1970-), “LOL”, an abbreviation for Laugh Out Loud, is part of the English-based digital slang that has been popularized far beyond the English-speaking world. LOL is part of text-slang, not an official part of language but of global common use in chats, tweets, messages etc. The text in a chat or a tweet is ephemeral; it represents a contrast between the permanency normally associated with writing and the impermanence and disposability of digital data in the XXI century. This abbreviation, done in neon, links the advertisement and the sign with the chat. It also recalls the global influence of the English language, and the pop culture and slang of the United States.
The series Untitled, (musical score) by Teresa Serrano (México, 1936-) is comprised of the works "Lili Marleen", "Yesterday", "Imagine", "That's Life", “Take Me Home, Country Roads”, the works contain fragments of popular songs from many eras. The first one in the series was “Cielito Lindo” and the second was "La Vie en Rose".  The process starts with the appropriation of the musical score and the later calligraphic intervention of a fragment of the song over it. The process is a happy nostalgia: the series has a playful quality while at the same time it recalls a sort of baroque ornament. By juxtaposing the two different languages of musical scores and lyrics, the series creates abstract, narrative drawings. On the first sight they look like abstract drawings, but they also recall the classical calligraphic style and at the same time are reminiscent of the Mexican ornate ironworks.  Abstract drawings meet vintage pop culture, intertwined with classic calligraphy.

 

Click image to open
Click image to open
Click image to open
Click image to open
Click image to open
Click image to open